Irish Red Ale Extract Kit w/ Specialty Grains

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SKU# U1010

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Irish ales are malty, smooth, and many, like our kit, are a rich copper-red color. Great taste, drinkability, and low aging requirements make this our best-selling kit.

We strongly recommend ordering dry yeast in the summer months. We do include complimentary ice packs with all liquid yeasts, but it is difficult to guarantee that the ice packs will survive the trip given transit times and particularly hot temperatures.

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Irish Red Ale Extract Kit with Specialty Grains

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  • Irish Red Ale Extract Kit with Specialty Grains
Product Details
Irish ales are malty, smooth, medium-bodied, and most, like our kit, are a deep copper-red color that is created by a blend of specialty malts. Our malt blend also gives this recipe its signature toasty and sweet aroma and flavor. Another defining characteristic of Irish Red Ales are their immense drinkability — definitely a crowd-pleasing beer. Its great taste, drinkability, and low aging requirements make this our best-selling kit.
Additional Information
Beer Kit Yield 5 Gallons
Recipe and Instructions Click Here!
Beer Style Amber Ale, Irish and Scottish Ales
Regional Style British
Color Amber
Original Gravity 1044
Total Time to Make 6 weeks
Q&A
Browse 6 questions and 29 answers
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I noticed the fermentation temp of the dry yeast is 57°-70° F. I don't have a spare fridge or a basement and keep my house at 72 degrees. How will the slightly higher fermentation temp will effect the beer? Should I even try it?
David C on Jun 30, 2015
Best Answer: Slightly higher than 70 degrees will ferment fine, but may produce a slight amount of fruity esters in the beer that may not be appropriate for this style. 72 degrees is not so far outside that range that you will see a large difference, though.
Reply · Report · Gabe @NBStaff on Jul 8, 2015
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How much yeast is included?
A shopper on Jun 25, 2015
Best Answer: You can order this kit with no yeast or one package of the yeast you prefer. It should only need the one packet.
Reply · Report · James JStaff on Jul 1, 2015
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The recipe calls for 2/3cup corn sugar but your priming sugar calculator says 1/2 cup. That's a huge difference. I'm ready to bottle but not sure what to do?
John K on Jun 11, 2015
Best Answer: The priming sugar packets in our kits, as well as the amount in the recipe, is an amount that will work for all styles. It is generic, but could be more carbonation than is really required for some beers. The priming sugar calculator presents a more precise amount that will provide an appropriate level of carbonation for the specific beer style.
Reply · Report · Bjorn BStaff on Jun 16, 2015
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Should (or can) I strain the liquid when transferring the primary fermentation batch to the second convoy for second stage fermenting?
A shopper on Jul 12, 2015
Best Answer: I would not recommend trying to strain the beer. There should not be a reason to, if you carefully siphon the beer out of the primary. Any material that does come over will settle out during the secondary stage. Furthermore, straining the beer will increase your chances of introducing oxygen into the finished product and oxidizing the beer. You want to eliminate any splashing or aeration during the transfer.
Reply · Report · Bjorn BStaff on Jul 12, 2015
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What is the bac?
A shopper on May 31, 2015
Best Answer: Depending on your apparent attenuation this should be around 4.2-4.5%.
Reply · Report · Aaron FStaff on Jun 5, 2015
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What is the recommended CO2 volume for kegging this beer?
Andrew A on Jul 12, 2015
Best Answer: I'd recommend about 2.3 volumes. Check a carbonation chart for the temp and pressure you need for your system.
Reply · Report · James JStaff on Jul 13, 2015
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