Speckled Heifer All-Grain Kit

SKU# U0394

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A tranquil time-out in a pint glass, a pastoral idyll, a sociable session ale dairyland-style: hey, sometimes a beer is just a beer. Have one.

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Product Details
Those among us who are or were farm-boys and -girls will correctly identify them as Holsteins; to the rest of the citified, sissified world they're “spotted cows.” This multigrained Midwestern take on the American cream ale is an uncomplicated, unfussy, lovable guzzler. Pouring straw gold with a snowy pillow of froth, the nose is gentle and sweet, full of its consituent blend of malted and flaked barley and corn, and the flavor is more of the same. Hops give a little whisper of flowers and spice from the background. A tranquil time-out in a pint glass, a pastoral idyll, a sociable session ale dairyland-style: hey, sometimes a beer is just a beer. Have one.
Additional Information
Beer Kit Yield5 Gallons
Recipe and InstructionsClick Here!
Regional StyleUSA
Original Gravity1042
Total Time to Make4 weeks
Reviews
4.6 / 5.0
33 Reviews
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Excellent Beer for Anyone
I generally like to make up my own recipes and roll with my creative brewing imagination, but when i don't I reach for a NB kit. This beer is wonderful. Brewed it twice nearly back to back and the keg was enjoyed by anyone who pulled a pint. Turned it from grain to keg in 10 days and used dry yeast both times. This beer is more complex than a crappy macro american adjunct lager and will still be enjoyed by those that favor those styles of beer. I will brew this one again, and again, and again, and again.....P.S. I love US-05. The second time I brewed this beer I had moved into a new place and it was the first beer I had fermented in that house. It was TOUGH to regulate temps in an old, horse-hair plaster, uninsulated house. Beer was way too warm, but still turned out good. The first one I kept at roughly 60-62 and the US-05 slowly churned away and made an amazing beer.
May 6, 2016
5 star beer
I brewed this for a baby shower that a group of friends were going to be attending and got outstanding feedback from everyone. Easy to drink and put smiles on everyone's faces. Highly recommend this one to everyone. Although it is ready to drink after a week in the bottle I would recommend two weeks or more for the flavors to mesh and mellow.
October 5, 2015
Great Beer Easy Recipe to follow
This is the first go around for me with this recipe I was surprised at the vicious fermentation that occurred and how quickly it went. I used the Wyeast American Ale. Kept the fermentation temps between 67-70 degrees. I kegged this and it has turned out great. I will brew this again
September 18, 2015
Always a great glass of beer!
Speckled Heifer was the first beer I ever brewed. It was fantastic then and fantastic each of the 6 times I have brewed it. It is a great session beer that craft and non-craft drinkers like equally. I have brewed both partial mash and all-grain. Each time the beer is smooth with a creamy finish. Just what a cream ale should be...brew this beer!
October 9, 2015
Great brew
I recommend adding a bit of dme to this recipe- but it is a major hit with everyone who tries it.
October 1, 2015
FANTASTIC
Brought a keg of this over to a party and it was gone in 2 hours. We have never cashed a keg at a day party so everyone was blown away and throwing compliments my way!!! great stuff!!!
April 20, 2014
Great summer beer
I brewed this with some repitched WLP029. Allegedly New Glarus uses a kolsch yeast in Spotted Cow. I brought back some Spotted Cow from WI to compare how close the kit is to what I assume it is supposed to taste like.In gravity it is a little lighter. My batch was had a little more sulfur than Spotted Cow, but the taste was very close and I was very happy with how it came out. It has the subtle corn sweetness that it is supposed to have.
September 11, 2014
Excellent Kit
I entered this in a BJCP-certified competition and won a gold medal for the category. Pick up this kit, follow the instructioins, and you & your buddies will be well pleased with the results.
Simple and Delicious
I recommend this recipe is brewed with Safale S-04 which plays perfectly on the cereal malts this recipe is composed of. S-04 will leave a little more body behind and give a nice bready malt backbone. It also will leave you with a clearer beer faster. Great recipe here...another simple yet masterfull NB creation.
February 2, 2011
Cold Ferment
I used Cry Havoc and fermented at 54 degrees and another batch at 74 degrees. Both turned out fantastic. I was surprised at the crisp finish and lager esk mouthfeel on the 54 deg. The 74 deg batch is a bit sweeter and more aroma from the cascade I added at burn out. Regardless both turned out great and will repeat. My only change in recipe would be more color. Both in my opinion were a bit too pale yellow. I will be adding some grain for color and maybe some noble's in secondary for more spicy finish on my lager esk at 54 deg.
October 1, 2012
Q&A
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Browse 2 questions Browse 2 questions and 3 answers
I am thinking of trying this out but only have equipment to do BIAB. Can you convert this to a 3 gallon BIAB batch?
Brian S on Aug 1, 2016
BEST ANSWER: Google is your friend. :) There are lots of calculator/software available that will do this for you, however, scaling a recipe is not rocket science. From Beer and Wine Journal...When scaling a homebrew recipe within a reasonable range of homebrew volumes, all the ingredients scale linearly. For example, to scale a 5.0-gallon (19-L) recipe to any size, multiply the amount of each malt by the new batch size (in gallons or L), then divide each by 5.0 gallons or 19 L as appropriate. For example, if a 5-gallon recipe calls for 13 oz. of roasted barley, and you want to brew 3 gallons of it, multiply the grain weight by 3 gallons (giving you 39 oz.-gallons) and then divide by 5 gallons (giving you 7.8 oz.).
Scale the amount of hops the same way. If the recipe recommends a yeast starter volume, scale it in this manner.
What's the difference between crushed and unmilled and why choose one over the other? Also, what additional equipment is needed?
J J on Jul 18, 2016
BEST ANSWER: With All-Grain kits the customer has the option of having the grain milled here at the warehouse, or being delivered unmilled, and they can put it through their own grain mill. If a person has a mill, and is not going to brew for a while, they might ask for it unmilled, so the grain stays fresher for a longer time. To do All-Grain brewing, a person needs a very large kettle, a mash tun, and a burner large enough to heat 7-9 gallons of water. A person can also do All-Grain with a simplified method called "Brew-In-A-Bag" or BIAB, this method just requires the large kettle and burner, and a very large mesh bag. -Mike W, Northern Brewer

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